Jukeboxes
A vast array of Jukeboxes, Player pianos and other music players from the past.
Jukeboxes
Jukeboxes
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Jukeboxes page 6

JR0501 Solotone Wallbox

Year 1940s They were unique, in that the wallbox also connected to an AM radio. You could 
select about 4 AM’s. The wallbox has a synchron timer motor. I think you got 5 
minutes for a dime. 

JR0503 Seeburg Wallbox Seeburg 3WA Wallbox

200 Selection, 1955-1958 ‘Remote Control for 200 select Seeburg jukebox’

JR0506 Seeburg Wallbox

Year 1940s
Stunning antique-vintage Seeburg Wall-O-Matic type W4-L56 wired music system jukebox for the 1940’s

JR0534 Buckley ‘Music Box’Wallbox

11 1/2″ tall, 8 3/4″ wide, and 4 1/2″ deep.
This is a Buckley 5¢ jukebox wall box remote control. The wall box would be mounted to the wall in your personal booth, or sat on the table – with this device, you could control the main unit, typically placed in the back of the establishment. This particular wall box only accepts nickels, and would allow you to select a single track – place up to 24 nickels into the machine to set a queue. The machine is crafted with a chromed aluminum case, and has decorative plastic trim.

JR0535 Seeburg 3WA Wallbox 200 Selection,

1955-1958
‘Remote Control for 200 select Seeburg jukebox’

JR0555 Wurlitzer 24 Selection Wallbox, Model 3031

This chrome tabletop or wall mount remote selector offers 24 selections chosen by a dial at the bottom front. Size 11″ T. x 7-1/2″ W. x 5-1/2″ D.

JR0556 Shyvers Multiphone Jukebox Selector

The Shyvers Multiphone, released in 1939 by Kenneth C. Shyvers, was an early model of a coin-operated phonograph (also known as a jukebox). It allowed patrons at restaurants, cafes and bars to play music at their table, and worked through telephone lines. This unit has no self contained music. The user inserted the necessary amount of coins, and was connected to a team of all-female disc jockeys in Seattle, who manually put on the selected song on a phonograph, playing the music through the telephone connection.

JR0567 Packard Wallbox ‘Play mor’

This wallbox was made to go with the Packard Pla-Mor in 1946 and the Manhatten in 1947.

JR0574 Seeburg 100 wall-o-matic Model 3W1

Wallbox 1 of 2
Year 1948
An original Seeburg 100 Wall-O-Matic , circa 1950’s. The wall box measures 13″ tall by 12.5″ wide by 6″ deep weighs 20 pounds The original chrome is in very good condition with no pitting Has the original key with manual and title strips The wall box was used in conjunction to a SeeBurg Select-O-Matic juke box. It was connected to the jukebox via a wiring harness which enabled a guest to insert typically a quarter and to select three songs. Sound was not transmitted from this wall box. It was only utilized a remote selector. This unit is original but offered only as a decorative collectible. To make the unit operational it would have to be connected to a SeeBurg jukebox

JR0576 AMI 40 selections Wallbox

31 x 20 x 15.5 cm (12 x 8 x 6″) Turn the knob to make your selection.

JR0583 Solotone Wallbox 5010

Year 1935
9.5″ tall, 8″ wide and 5.25″ deep.
Coin operated Solotone speaker wall box. I understand that this box was used to remotely control a Wurlitzer model 5010 jukebox back in the mid-1930’s. 

JR0589 Personal Music Corp

Year 1940 Phonette Wallbox Melody Lane Model made by Personal Music Corporation
These used to be in restaurants, for a nickel you could play a song, through the phone lines. This same company made a one-cent model called Penny Serenade around 1940 or so

JR0206 Seeburg Wall-O-Matic Wallbox Model 3WA

Year 1956
(H) 14.5″  x (W) 12.5″  x (D) 8″
Like the 100 which preceded it, the splendidly named Seeburg 200 Wall-O-Matic V-3WA would originally have been connected to a full-sized Seeburg jukebox, allowing 1950’s diner customers to make their music selections without having to get up.

JR0197 Buckley ‘Music Box’ Wallbox

Year 1940s 11 1/2″ tall, 8 3/4″ wide, and 4 1/2″ deep. This is a Buckley 5¢ jukebox wall box remote control. The wall box would be mounted to the wall in your personal booth, or sat on the table – with this device, you could control the main unit, typically placed in the back of the establishment. This particular wall box only accepts nickels, and would allow you to select a single track – place up to 24 nickels into the machine to set a queue. The machine is crafted with a chromed aluminum case, and has decorative plastic trim.

JR0260  AMI Music Wallbox, Model 200

1953-1955
‘Remote Control for 120 select Ami jukebox’ This wallbox is presently set on ONE PLAY for a DIME or TWO NICKELS and FIVE PLAYS for a QUARTER.  The coin instructions on the cover are matching.

JR0315 AMI Wallbox 40 selections

31 x 20 x 15.5 cm (12 x 8 x 6″)
Turn the knob to make your selection.

JR0345 Wurlitzer Wallbox

Year 1946-50
12 x 9 x 6″
24 selections
5, 10, 25 Cent

JR0328 Rock-Ola Wallbox  Model 1546

‘Remote Control for the 120 select Rock-Ola jukebox’

Jukeboxes page 6